When two vowels go walking…

When two vowels go walking …

It is more than a little helpful to have a handy set of flash cards ready to prompt younger learners and give them reading cues. When learning about “vowel pairs”, for example, cue cards like these are colourful and attractive:

As the time-honoured reading prompt goes: “When two vowels go walking, the first does the talking …” Then, feeling smug with your handy flash cards, you help the child out with the picture provided: “oa” makes “coat.”

To my surprise, the most effective set of flash cards that I have used with my Gr. 1 student is one that she created herself. When I uttered the phrase “when two vowels go walking …” she immediately drew some minuscule legs on a couple of little vowels:

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Note that the first attempt had a minor error: the order of the vowels. I urged her to reconsider: the first does the talking. She re-arranged accordingly and proceeded to create different vowel pairs “meeting” each other. The following results were stupendous:

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The student rapidly became familiar with which vowels formed which pairs. The truth is, the effectiveness of these homemade flash cards should not have come as a surprise to me. Involving the child in the learning process is essential to developing their ability to retain the concepts and apply them.

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-Miriam

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Spring at Little House

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Spring has officially sprung here at Little House, and we are celebrating the changing of the seasons with a new writing contest! This new contest will not only challenge our students’ imaginations but also their poetry skills. In order to be in the running for the mystery prize, the students must write an acrostic poem centered around spring time.

Acrostics are a fun poetic form that anyone can write by following just a few simple guidelines. To begin, an acrostic poem is a poem in which the first letters of each line spell out a word or phrase. For our acrostic, we will be spelling out the word “SPRING”. Usually, the first letter of each line is capitalized, as this makes it easier to see the word spelled vertically down the page. The nice thing about acrostic poems is that they don’t need to rhyme, and they don’t have to follow a specific rhythm.

Students are encouraged to participate in the contest by brainstorming about what they think of when they think of spring, and creating a descriptive acrostic poem!

-Paige